Falco Paperwork in Slovenija

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SloFalco
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jan 02, 2021 9:17 pm

Falco Paperwork in Slovenija

Post by SloFalco »

Hello Falco builders and owners,

I am building Seqair Falco F8L airplane in Slovenija. Although my country is next to Italy unfortunately there was no original Falco ever registered in Slovenija. Therefore I have problem to get permission to officially build that airplane without Type certificate issued for that airplane type.

One way to get that certificate is to apply User Service Experience as proof that airplane construction is safe to fly if it is build according to plans. I should present testimony of builders or users of that airplane of how many hours are in use with notification if there was any issues regarding design of the airplane or installed parts and equipment. Any calculations of airplane structure will be also very helpful.

Any copies of Airplane Type certificate issued in your country will be also very heplful. I didn’t find anything regarding that on internet. I have copy of German Type certificate for original Falco and LAA Type Acceptance Data sheet for Falco F8L but that is not enough for CAA (agency in Slovenija).

I will appreciate if anybody can supply me with information about experience using/flying this magnificent airplane (brief explanation of way of using, total flight time, how was built, if possible some picture).

Attached is picture of my progress so far which is now stopped until above mentioned papers will be issued.

Best Regards, Peter

Peter Mlinaric
peter.mlinaric@siol.net
mobiltel: +386 51 314650
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NVmtnguy
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Oct 16, 2020 11:28 am

Re: Falco Paperwork in Slovenija

Post by NVmtnguy »

I currently own and operate Sequoia Falco F8-L N141CJ, completed in 1985 by John Harns from the Sequoia kits - #518, under US FAA Experimental Amateur- Built rules. This was one of the earliest- completed of the Sequoia kits. The aircraft currently has approximately 2000 hours' operational time. I have owned the aircraft since 2017, and have spent hundreds of hours' time inspecting, analyzing, updating avionics, and maintaining the aircraft in that time. I expect the aircraft to continue functioning, as designed, for many years to come.
The structure and design is excellent, and results in a robust aircraft if completed in accord with the Sequoia plans and standard aviation usage. I verify this from my background as a licensed Airframe & Powerplant Maintenance Technician: I began working on [certified/ Part 23] aircraft in 1975, and have continued in that craft at least part-time, since. That work has included exposure to/ maintenance or repair of a multitude of Type- Certificated aircraft, from Cessnas to Pipers to Grumman [TBM] to Beechcraft to North American airframes.
N141CJ has been used as a private aircraft, for cross country travel as well as local enjoyment, including aerobatic maneuvers [within the design envelope]- by both the original builder and myself. These flights have included VFR and IFR flights; the records I have indicate more than one [unintentional] flight into icing conditions, with airframe accumulation but no departure from controlled flight. [This does NOT MEAN I recommend repeating this experience.] I expect the aircraft to continue in cross-country and local flights for many hundreds of hours in future.
I have also personally flown and inspected another Sequoia Falco, which is based approximately 25 miles [40km] from my home base in Northern Nevada. That aircraft is routinely used by its owner for commutes between his homes in Northern Nevada, and Southern Alaska. The aircraft has been making those flights twice annually for several years -- in addition to local flights, and flights to the Bahamas, Florida, etc.
The Falco's flight characteristics are predictable - and for many, delightful. A friend recently described his SF-260 [a later metal derivative of the Falco intended for military flight training] as "not for children" -- and I believe this also describes the Falco. That is, it is entirely controllable, but needs attention, and prior experience of high-speed, or at least high-performance/ high wingloaded airframes. It does NOT require training as a 'fighter-pilot' - just a realistic expectation that it is a 'slick' plane, with essentially neutral control regime -- and understanding what those characteristics require of the pilot. This is not a 'spam can' that can be 'driven' by just any Aunt Martha... but the Falco doesn't require a lion- tamer, either.

Hopefully, others will add their notes. Should you need specific questions/ technical descriptions for the bureaucrats, please identify the parameters of their inquiries, and I'll try to point to the answers.
Ben Kramer
ASEL, LSRM-A/WS/G, A&P
SloFalco
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jan 02, 2021 9:17 pm

Re: Falco Paperwork in Slovenija

Post by SloFalco »

Hello,
Updaing my progress over last two years. Wing is finally closed and as you can see in picture prepared for static wing load test required from Slovenian CAA agency (to get Falco Type certificate, nessesary in Slovenija for airplane Airworthiness certificate). So I must proof that I follow plans, use right materials, right building methods... Everybody that will build Falco in Slovenija after me dont need to do wing load test ... For CAA in Slovenija, amater built aircraft must have type certificate registered the same as all production aircrafts. It is strange because probable not two amater build Falcos are the same. I must also rewrite all electric shemes to fit my arrangement... That is problem when you live in 2 milion people country with rigid bureaucracy. I ordered engine IO-360-B1F that was factory rebuild (was used in domestic airplane Soko UTVA 75). I will probable converted it to B1E since is except oil sump very similar to rear air intake engine. Looking forward to join fuselage and wing in next month.
Best Regards, Peter
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SloFalco
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jan 02, 2021 9:17 pm

Re: Falco Paperwork in Slovenija

Post by SloFalco »

Hello again from Slovenija,
After tons (in weight) of preparations finally my wing was tested according to our CAA recomendations.
3220 kg was used for testing resulting the wing tip lowering 160mm. After unload wing tip return to zero position.
No delamination occured during test and very small deflection of skin between rib 4 and 5 on both sides. Complete inspection of wing sign no dimensional or geometric changes after test. Next work will be complete reorganizing of workshop to make place for joining fuselage and wing.
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EdLetti
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2020 2:59 pm

Re: Falco Paperwork in Slovenija

Post by EdLetti »

Awesome work.

How many "g's" do you think all that weight is equivalent to?

Thanks

Eduardo Letti
Falco N1443D
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